The Black Stone Is Now Available For Purchase!

kalendar-stone

At long last, release the Kraken!

The Wheel of Existence turns at the Common Era’s most extraordinary time imaginable. After billions of years of evolution, a Rounder has been born at Zero who returns from Beyond to dwell amongst the mortals.

He is Kalen O’Tolan. His young appearance belies the secret of his immortality, an Aeon-spanning Kalendar to which his life and times are aligned. As the world of the Iron Age advances to heighted culture and civilization, he ages slowly in his boyhood. Kalen is aided by parents of mysterious ancestry, his loyal brother and tenacious sisters, the Wizard Aupaiaaqua, and other extraordinary beings.

The old world of Magic is dying, and every magical Power is set for turmoil. Corrupted and evil, Aries-Pisces leads the fight to destroy the Rounder and seize the Artifacts of Orr which the boy Kalen is charged to find and protect. Kalen must obtain the Black Stone and win the trust of the Great Bear who will lead the forces of Animwaa in the War of the Zodiacs.

Miraculously, the future of humankind depends on the outcome of the hero’s quest. A terrifying calamity called the Nadir approaches the world in 2,111 C.E. Kalen must find a way to communicate with someone alive in the present day who can alert humankind to the approaching threat in order to take corrective action before it’s too late.

The fate of Existence itself depends on Kalen’s ability to influence the development of Lingua-U, a new Universal Meta-Language, in our time. The Black Stone comprises two distinct works: “The Omphalos of Delphi,” a fantasy novel, and “The Surrender of Symbiosis,” an epic-length philosophical poem. Both books are joined under one cover and offer interwoven explorations of human meaning-making at the foundations of consciousness.

The Black Stone is the first in a series of nine genre-disrupting works offering a mix of fiction, poetry, art, and philosophy. Together they will make up The Kalendar Series, an epic volume which tells a single story spanning the entire globe of the Earth beginning more than 2,000 years in our past and ending nearly 1,000 years in our future. This is a work that testifies to the emerging human capacity to create languages, tell stories, paint pictures, sing songs, and predict the future from an integrated sense of a unique identity as participants and co-creators in the evolution of Kosmos.

“A sort of Lord of the Rings meets Integral Spirituality meets The Canon of Supreme Mystery (among others). If you enjoy — and are ready for — sprawling epics built with spiritually integrated circuitry, The Black Stone is for you — brilliant, compelling, original, beautiful.” – Ken Wilber, The Integral Vision.

Paperback: http://www.amazon.com/Kalendar-Book-One-Black-Stone/dp/1495187705/ref=sr_1_1

Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/Kalendar-Black-Stone-Book-One-ebook/dp/B01F4E1LL8/ref=sr_1_cc_1

The Integral Critic’s Dilemma: Beams And Struts Or Soft And Squishy?

By Joe Perez

Given that I wrote recently about an essay of Frank Visser’s which raised the topic of Ken Wilber’s 2006 Wyatt Earp post, I was given the opportunity to re-read what Ken had to say about cross-altitude criticism. It’s an important topic owing to the Integral worldview’s finding that there is not one consciousness that all people share, but a variety of worldspaces conditioned by our developmental level, each of which interact with other extant worldspaces out of virtually inescapable prisms of their own action-logic. Religious fundamentalists and postmodern feminist theorists don’t just disagree about facts, they talk right past each other in ways that neither quite understands.

In “What We Are, That We See. Part I: Response to Some Recent Criticism in a Wild West Fashion” (the Wyatt Earpy post), Ken Wilber wrote:

In short, it’s just ridiculous to say that I try to hide from this criticism, I live on it! Every new truth I find, I rejoice. That’s why it went from wilber-1 all the way to wilber-5. This is what second tier does automatically anyway, it takes new truths wherever it finds themand weaves them into larger tapestries. It can’t help doing so! If I find one, I am ecstatic! So mark this well: Only a first-tier mentality would even think that one would run away from good criticism. But then these folks…. Okay, I won’t even take a shot at that one, too easy.

But I suppose it should be pointed out that many of the ideas these critics offer are in fact at a green or orange altitude, and not even teal or turquoise altitude, where they could at least begin to see the integral patterns that connect. These critics simply cannot see these phenomena, which are “over their heads,” to borrow Kegan’s felicitous phrase—and they get absolutely furious, and I mean furious, when this is pointed out or even mentioned.

But furious or not, that happens to be a completely valid critical approach. So I’ll stop teasing the animals for a moment and get serious. For the developmentalist, some ideas are not at the altitude of those they are criticizing, and those criticisms, in those specific aspects, are nonsensical. Strictly speaking, they are neither true nor false, but empty.

Continue reading “The Integral Critic’s Dilemma: Beams And Struts Or Soft And Squishy?”

Integral Thinkers, Like Poets, Underacknowledged Visionaries

In “How Has the Social Role of Poetry Changed Since Shelley?” in The New York Times, Adam Kirsch explains a key difference between Romantic poets such as Percy Bysshe Shelley and poets of today. It is the “the imaginative confidence of poets themselves”:

“Shelley was wrong to think that writing poems like ‘Queen Mab’ or ‘Prometheus Unbound’ would bring revolutionary change to England, but his conviction that they would is what allowed him to write the poems in the first place. Today, poets with a grasp of reality must start from the premise that nothing they write will be much read or have much influence on public discourse. A poetry written under such circumstances may have its own virtues, but they will not be the virtues of the Romantics — conceptual boldness, metaphysical reach, the drive to bring religion and politics themselves under the empire of art. As if in recognition of this fact, poets in our time prefer to imagine themselves not as legislators, but as witnesses — those who look on, powerless to chayou thinge the world, but sworn at least to tell the truth about it.”

One thing which hasn’t changed since the Romantics’ day is the lack of much acknowledgement of poetry among the majority of the population, including the folks in power. He writes:

It would be a mistake, then, to think that the social role of poetry has actually changed very much in the last 200 years. Poets were unacknowledged then, by a vast majority of the population, and they are only slightly less acknowledged now. No one in power in 1814 was asking for Shelley’s views on the Congress of Vienna, just as no one in power in 2014 is asking for John Ashbery’s views on climate change.

If you think about it, the social stature of Integral thought is aligned with poets in certain ways. And I would suggest that we can learn a thing of two from the Romantic poets’ boldness of vision.

In a day when poets have ceded the role of “legislators of the world”, any sort of grand epic vision of reality, one might turn to philosophy. But there too the mainstream philosophers of our time seldom make bold grand syntheses which put themselves as arbiters of truth, even people with something to say of Truth itself (by the way, who writes with capital letters these days? where have the neo-Platonists gone?)

No, for grand, bold thinkers who are in a sense similar to the Romantic poets setting themselves forth as “legislators of the world”, you have to turn to Integral thinkers and artists. I am one of them. And I would venture to say that my role within the pantheon of Integral folks mine is that of a more Romantic type than the Rationalistic type.

Continue reading “Integral Thinkers, Like Poets, Underacknowledged Visionaries”

Zendesk CEO: “The Best Thing A Company Can Do Is Embrace Its Mistakes.”

Mikkel Svane

Humility is good for business. What does a business built on the values of transparency and authenticity do when it outrages its customers? Zendesk CEO Mikkel Svane tells Fast Company that after the shock wore off, he learned valuable lessons:

Zendesk launched a series of new features and changed its cost structure last May and alerted its customers via its blog and email. The response was immediate outrage. Comments on the Zendesk blog ranged from, “An increase of 74%? Seriously??!!!” to, “This seems extortionate, we are facing a 100%+ increase, what are you playing at Zendesk.”

Svane tells Fast Company that in hindsight, he can see why they were upset. “The problem wasn’t as much in the pricing and plans, the problem was for the customers it was all too complicated and they lost confidence in us.” (Sound familiar?)

Admitting the emails Zendesk sent out to customers were full of “mumbo jumbo,” was for Svane the first step to fixing the problem. However, the company did not respond to individual complaints immediately and Svane even took heat for tweeting, “I hope all the new sexy Zendesk features don’t drown in today’s noise.”

He attributed the (brief) delay in addressing customer complaints to “a period of shock, like after an accident.” …

[H]e says, “Building a business, especially at this pace, you are making mistakes all the time. The best thing a company can do is embrace its mistakes.”

Flexibility and responsiveness are qualities of leadership that ought not to be taken for granted. How many times have companies fallen short and responded to hardship by digging in their heels or burying their head in the sand (remember BP and the Gulf Oil Crisis?)

An integral vision of business leadership is able to rely on a variety of factors in making sense of differences in leadership style between very different companies. An ability to embrace mistakes is dependent on the psychological capacity of its leaders to hold more expansive and integrative visions than traditional companies.